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Asian Network for Scientific Information is a leading service provider to the publishers of Science, Technology and Medicine (STM) in Asia. Currently Asian Network for Scientific Information is serving more than 37 peer-reviewed journals covering a wide range of academic disciplines to foster communication among scientists, researchers, students and professionals - enabling them to work more efficiently and intelligently, thereby advancing knowledge and learning.

International Journal of Poultry Science
eISSN: 1994-7992
pISSN: 1682-8356

Editor-in-Chief:  Ibrahim Seker
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Research Article
An Assessment of the Impact of Government Policies on Broiler Production in Peninsular Malaysia
Zineb Abdulaker Benalywa, Mohd Mansor Ismail, Mad Nasir Shamsudin and Zulkornain Yusop
Objectives: This study was designed to assess the impact of Malaysian government policies on broiler production in Peninsular Malaysia. Methodology: The study compared contract and non-contract farmers who produced and sold chickens according to three different production sizes. A policy analysis matrix containing policy protection indicators was used to evaluate the impact of government protection on broiler production in Peninsular Malaysia. Data were collected from 310 farms in Peninsular Malaysia using a field survey. Results: The results suggest that broiler production under contract farming is more profitable than under non-contract farming. Calculation of the nominal protection coefficient reveals that producers are not protected by the existing policies.Conclusion: The broiler industry is in need of government assistance in order to enhance its competitiveness.
Research Article
Using Prophylactic Salmonella Immune Lymphokines to Resist the Avian Influenza in Broiler Chickens
Mushtaq T.B. AL-Zuhariy
Objective: The current study aimed to increase the resistance of broiler chickens against Avian Influenza Virus (AIV) type H5N8. Early infections with AIV are caused by weak immunity, whether maternal or acquired immunity from vaccinations and all the AIV vaccines are killed vaccines that provide absolute protection after three weeks of vaccination, which makes the chicks susceptible to infection at an early age. Our goal is to enhance the immune resistance against avian influenza at an early age by using immune lymphokines from hyperimmunized chickens with Salmonella enteriditis. Materials and Methods: The experiment was carried out on 250 broiler chicks divided into five groups, with 50 chicks per group. All groups were treated at the first day as follows: G1: injected with Salmonella-immune lymphokines (S-ILK) intraperitoneally after a 30 min intramuscular challenge with AIV (H5N8). G2: Salmonella-nonimmune lymphokines (S-NILK) were injected intraperitoneally after a 30 min intramuscular challenge with AIV (H5N8). G3: injected with S-ILK without a challenge with AIV (H5N8). G4: only challenged with AIV (H5N8) and considered a positive control group. G5: not treated and not challenged and considered a negative control group. Results: The results of the present study showed a significant increase (p<0.05) in the antibody titre in all treated groups, except the G3 and G5 groups, which were not challenged. The G1 group recorded a moderate increase in antibodies with the lowest mortality rate, followed by the G2 group, compared to the G4 group, which recorded a 100% mortality rate on day 28 after challenge. The results of the viral load revealed the highest number of the influenza RNA copies in the G4 group compared with the G1 group, which recorded the lowest number of RNA copies that did not pose a serious risk to the lives of infected birds, followed by G2. Conclusion: Giving S-ILK at early ages increases the immune resistance against avian influenza (H5N8), which in turn compensates for live vaccines at early ages.
Research Article
The Effect of Dietary Binahong [Anredera cordifolia (Ten.) Steenis] Leaf Meal Supplementation on Total Ileal Bacteria and Jejunal Histomorphology in Broiler Chickens
Nur Widodo, Wihandoyo , Zuprizal and Nanung Danar Dono
Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the effect of Binahong Leaf Meal (BLM) as a feed additive on the ileal bacteria and jejunal histomorphology of broiler chickens. Methodology: One hundred and ninety-two day old male broiler chickens were divided into six treatments groups of eight chickens each; each experiment was performed four times. The treatment groups were as follows: T0 (control negative), T1 (control positive; tetracycline 50 ppm), T2 (1% BLM), T3 (2% BLM), T4 (4% BLM) and T5 (8% BLM). Results: The addition of BLM significantly increased the amount of E. coli ileal bacteria, jejunum height and depth of jejunum crypts across groups T0-T5 (p<0.01). Addition of BLM significantly increased the amount of ileal lactic acid bacteria and width of jejunum villi across groups T0-T5 (p<0.05). Conclusion: The addition of 2% BLM increased the amount of E. coli ileal bacteria and ileal Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) and increased villi height and width and jejunum crypt depth in broiler chickens.
Research Article
Effects of Self-Selection Diets Differing in Cereal Source and Protein Level on Broiler Performance
Waleed M. Razuki, Mezhir K. Abed and Hussam H. N. Al-Naif
Objective: An experiment was conducted to investigate the effects on broiler performance caused by the free choice of three-phase-feeding diets with different cereal sources (maize or wheat) and dietary protein levels. Materials and Methods: Four-hundred and eighty 1-day old Ross-308 male broiler chicks were used in a 42-day trial. The experiment consisted of 8 treatments, which are as follows: MN: Birds were fed a single maize-soybean diet with a normal level of dietary protein, WN: Birds were fed a single wheat-soybean diet with a normal level of dietary protein, ML: Birds were fed a single maize-soybean diet with a low level of dietary protein, WL: Birds were fed a single wheat-soybean diet with a low level of dietary protein, MNWN: Birds were fed a mixture of two diets of MN and WN, MLWL: Birds were fed a mixture of two diets of ML and WL, MNWL: Birds were fed on a mixture of the two diets MN and WL and MLWN: Birds were fed on a mixture of the two diets ML and WN. Each dietary treatment consisted of 4 replicates (15 birds/pen). Results: Normal protein levels in the free-choice feeding significantly increased the Body Weight Gain (BWG) and feed consumption for birds fed maize or wheat as single or mixed diets. Choice diets of normal and low levels of dietary protein achieved a BWG that was not significantly different from birds fed normal dietary protein. The most detrimental effects were shown in birds that were fed a low dietary protein and a wheat-based diet. Birds that were given free-choice feeding of maize or wheat tended to consume a diet containing wheat, irrespective of protein level. The results of this experiment indicate that feeding a wheat diet is more suitable for the Ross 308 strain than feeding maize. Conclusion: The level of dietary protein plays an important role in performance but feeding behavior depends mainly on the different sources of grain

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